Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 90-"Down Hearted Blues"

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 90–Down Hearted Blues
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< Down Hearted Blues

Nicknamed The Empress of the Blues, Bessie Smith was the most popular female blues singer of the 1920s and 1930s.[1] She is often regarded as one of the greatest singers of her era and, along with Louis Armstrong, a major influence on other jazz vocalists.
All contemporary accounts indicate that while Rainey did not teach Smith to sing, she probably helped her develop a stage presence.[7] Smith began forming her own act around 1913, at Atlanta’s "81" Theater. By 1920, Smith had established a reputation in the South and along the Eastern Seaboard.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 89–Hound Dog
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< Hound Dog

Big Mama Thornton’s performances were characterized by her deep, powerful voice and strong sense of self. She tapped into a liberated black feminist persona, through which she freed herself from many of the expectations of musical, lyrical, and physical practice for black women .
In the 1970s, years of heavy drinking began to hurt Thornton’s health. She was in a serious auto accident, but recovered to perform at the 1973 Newport Jazz Festival with Muddy Waters, B.B. King, and Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson, a recording of which is called The Blues—A Real Summit Meeting released by Buddha Records.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 88–Stack O’ Lee Blues
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< Stack O’ Lee Blues

Before World War II, it was commonly known as "Stack O’Lee". W.C. Handy wrote that this probably was a nickname for a tall person, comparing him to the tall smokestack of the large steamboat Robert E. Lee
In 1950, a version by New Orleans pianist Archibald reached #10 on the Billboard R&B chart.[14] Lloyd Price recorded the song in 1958, and it rose to the top of both the R&B and US pop charts in early 1959 .

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 87 – Frankie & Johnny
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< Frankie & Johnny

Mississippi John Hurt began to play local dances and parties while working as a sharecropper. He first recorded for Okeh Records in 1928, but these recordings were commercial failures.
Material recorded by him has been re-released by many record labels over the years and his songs have been recorded by Bob Dylan, Jerry Garcia, Beck, Doc Watson, John McCutcheon, Taj Mahal, Bruce Cockburn, David Johansen, Bill Morrissey, Gillian Welch, Guthrie Thomas, Parsonsfield, and Rory Block.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 86 – Diggin’ My Potatoes
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< Diggin’ My Potatoes

Born in Walnut Ridge, Arkansas and reputedly the half-brother of Big Bill Broonzy, Washboard Sam moved to Memphis, Tennessee in the 1920s, performing as a street musician with Sleepy John Estes and Hammie Nixon.
In 1935, he began recording in his own right for both Bluebird and Vocalion Records,becoming one of the most popular Chicago blues performers of the late 1930s and 1940s

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 85 – Bumble Bee
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< Bumble Bee

In 1910, at the age of 13, Memphis Minnie ran away from her home to live on Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee. She played on street corners for most of her teenage years.
She made her money by playing guitar, singing, and prostitution, which was not uncommon at the time, since many female performers also worked as prostitutes because of financial desperation.[6]

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 84 – We Gonna Move
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< We Gonna Move (To The Outskirkts Of Town)

Casey Bill Weldon was known as one of the early pioneers of the slide guitar.[2] He played upbeat, hokum and country blues tunes.
Playing a National steel guitar flat on his lap Hawaiian style, "Casey Bill" Weldon was known as the "Hawaiian Guitar Wizard". He was married to singer and guitarist Memphis Minnie in the 1920s.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 83 – Married Woman Blues
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< Married Woman Blues

Cited as a major influence by no less than John Lee Hooker, Delta blues singer/guitarist Tony Hollins was born in Clarksdale, Mississippi around the turn of the century.
Hollins never caught on as a popular favorite, and after another session in 1951, he gradually drifted out of music, focusing instead on his day job as a barber. He died in Chicago in 1959.

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 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 82 – A Spoonful Blues
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< A Spoonful Blues

Patton was born in Hinds County, Mississippi, near the town of Edwards, and lived most of his life in Sunflower County in the Mississippi Delta. Most sources say he was born in April 1891, but the years 1881, 1885 and 1887 have also been suggested.
In 1900, his family moved 100 miles (160 km) north to the 10,000-acre (40 km2) Dockery Plantation sawmill and cotton farm near Ruleville, Mississippi. It was here that both John Lee Hooker and Howlin’ Wolf fell under the Patton spell as well as Willie Brown, Tommy Johnson, and Fiddlin’ Joe Martin.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 81 – Hard Time Killing Floor Blues
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< Hard Time Killing Floor Blues

Skip James was born near Bentonia, Mississippi. His father was a converted bootlegger turned preacher. As a youth, James heard local musicians such as Henry Stuckey and brothers Charlie and Jesse Sims and began playing the organ in his teens.
In early 1931, James auditioned for Jackson, Mississippi, record shop owner and talent scout H. C. Speir, who placed blues performers with a variety of record labels including Paramount Records.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 80 – La Valse Ah Abe
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< La Valse Ah Abe

Ardoin, with fiddle player Dennis McGee, was one of the first artists to record the music of the Acadiana region of Louisiana. On December 9, 1929, he and McGee recorded six songs for Columbia Records in New Orleans.[3] In all, thirty-four recordings with Ardoin playing accordion are known to exist.
The date and place of his death is uncertain. Descendants of family members and musicians who knew Ardoin tell a story, now well-known, about a racially motivated attack on him in which he was severely beaten, probably between 1939 – 1940, while walking home after playing at a house dance near Eunice, Louisiana.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 79 - Scandalous And A Shame
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< Scandalous And A Shame

Taggart was born in Abbeville, South Carolina, and by 1910 attended South Carolina Institute for the Deaf, Dumb and Blind in Spartanburg. By 1917, he was living and working as a musician in Atlanta, Georgia.
Taggart recorded secular blues song under several pseudonyms, for different labels, including Paramount and Decca.[

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 78 - Vicksburg Blues
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< Vicksburg Blues

Early on Little Brother Montgomery played at African American lumber and turpentine camps in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Mississippi, then with the bands of Clarence Desdunes and Buddy Petit.
In 1942 Montgomery moved back to Chicago, which would be his base for the rest of his life, with various tours to other United States cities and Europe.[2] In the late 1950s he was "discovered" by wider white audiences. He toured briefly with Otis Rush in 1956.[3] His fame grew in the 1960s, and he continued to make many recordings, including on his own record label, FM Records (formed in 1969).[

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 77 - Avalon Blues
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< Avalon Blues

When Narmour got a chance to record for Okeh Records as a prize for winning first place in a 1928 fiddle contest, he recommended Hurt to Okeh Records producer Tommy Rockwell.
Hurt described his first recording session as such : a great big hall with only the three of us in it : me, the man [Rockwell], and the engineer. It was really something. I sat on a chair, and they pushed the microphone right up to my mouth and told me that I couldn’t move after they had found the right position. I had to keep my head absolutely still. Oh, I was nervous, and my neck was sore for days after.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 76 - When The Levee Breaks
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< When The Levee Breaks

During the flood and the years after it subsided, it became the subject of numerous Delta blues songs, including "When the Levee Breaks"
The song focused mainly on when more than 13,000 residents in and near Greenville, Mississippi evacuated to a nearby, unaffected levee for its shelter at high ground.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 75 - Statesboro blues
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< Statesboro blues

Because of the song, rumor had it that McTell was born in Statesboro ; he was, in fact, born in Thomson, Georgia
The eight sides he recorded for Victor, including "Statesboro Blues," were described as "superb examples of storytelling in music, coupled with dazzling guitar work.

center> » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 74 - Mr Crump Don’t Like it

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< Mr Crump Don’t Like it

Frank Stokes, a burly blacksmith, can be said to have laid the foundations of what became accepted as Memphis blues with a long series of solo records and unparalleled duets with Dan Sane as the Beale Street Sheiks.
After his recording career ended, Stokes carried on playing music locally, and a young B. B. King spoke about his house parties and star guests.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 73 - I’m A King Bee
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< I’m A King Bee

Slim Harpo started his own recording career in March 1957, working with A&R man and record producer J. D. "Jay" Miller in Crowley, Louisiana.
At his wife’s suggestion, he took the name Slim Harpo in order to differentiate himself from another performer called Harmonica Slim.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 72 - Matchbox Blues
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< Matchbox Blues

Blind Lemon Jefferson was one of the most popular blues singers of the 1920s, and has been called "Father of the Texas Blues
Prior to Jefferson, very few artists had recorded solo voice and blues guitar, the first of which was vocalist Sara Martin and guitarist Sylvester Weaver.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 71 - Who’s Been Talking
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< Who’s Been Talking

Howlin Wolf was named Chester Arthur Burnett, after Chester A. Arthur, the 21st President of the United States.
He explained the origin of the name Howlin’ Wolf : "I got that from my grandfather", who would often tell him stories about the wolves in that part of the country and warn him that if he misbehaved then the "howling wolves would get him".

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 70 - Barrel House Blues
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< Barrel House Blues

During a March 1924 visit to Atlanta, OKeh made the historic first-ever field recording of a male blues singer/guitarist, Ed Andrews, who was seen busking on the street.
Andrews accompanied himself with utilitarian pick-and-strum guitar.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 69 - Feel So Bad
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< Feel So Bad

Willis was spotted at a talent contest by Atlanta radio disc jockey Zenas Sears, who became his manager and helped him to sign with Columbia Records in 1951
After one single, Willis began recording on a Columbia subsidiary, Okeh.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 68 - Stealin’ Stealin
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< Stealin’ Stealin’

The song is particularly identified with the jug band tradition.
Gus Cannon claimed to have written the opening line, "Put your arms around me like a circle ’round the sun. However, this line doesn’t appear in any of his recorded songs.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 67 - See See Rider Blues
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< See See Rider Blues

The term "See See Rider" is usually taken as synonymous with "easy rider." In particular, in blues songs it often refers to a woman who had liberal sexual views, had been married more than once, or was skilled at sex.
Another incorrect theory is that the term "easy rider" sometimes originally referred to the guitar hung across the back of a travelling blues singer

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 66 - Sloppy Drunk Blues
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< Sloppy Drunk Blues

Lucie Bogan a.k.a Bessie Jackson first recorded vaudeville songs for Okeh Records in New York in 1923, with pianist Henry Callens
By 1930 her recordings had begun to concentrate on drinking and sex. She also recorded the original version of "Black Angel Blues"

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 65 - Guitar Blues
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< Guitar Blues

Sylvester Weaver recorded until 1927, sometimes accompanied by Sara Martin, about 50 additional songs.
He often used the bottleneck-style method, playing his guitar with a knife. His recordings were quite successful but in 1927 he retired and went back to Louisville until his death in 1960.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 64 - Jock-A-Mo
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< Jock-A-Mo

Starting out on trombone, Crawford formed a band which local DJ Doctor Daddy-O named "The Chapaka Shawee" (Creole for "We Aren’t Raccoons"), the title of an instrumental that they played.
In 1969, he decided to limit his singing to in church only. In 2012 Crawford made a guest appearance singing gospel on an episode of the HBO series Treme.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 63 - Crazy Blues
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Mamie Smith was an American vaudeville singer, dancer, pianist and actress, who appeared in several films late in her career. As a vaudeville singer she performed a number of styles, including jazz and blues.
She danced in Salem Tutt Whitney’s Smart Set. In 1913, she left the Tutt Brothers to sing in clubs in Harlem and married a singer named William "Smitty" Smith.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 62 - One Room Country Shack
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Mercy Dee Walton started playing piano at age 13 and learned his style from many of the ten-cent party house pianists that played out in the country on weekends.
He made his first record for the small record label, Spire Records in Fresno.[4] The track was "Lonesome Cabin Blues"

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 61 - What’s The Matter With The Mill ?
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What’s The Matter With The Mill ?
In 1929 Memphis Minnie and Kansas Joe McCoy, her second husband, began to perform together.
They were discovered by a talent scout of Columbia Records in front of a barber shop where they were playing for dimes.[7] When she and McCoy went to record in New York, they were given the names Kansas Joe and Memphis Minnie by a Columbia A&R man.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 60 - Tupelo
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Tupelo
Hooker’s recording career began in 1948 when his agent placed a demo, made by Hooker, with the Bihari brothers, owners of the Modern Records label.
The company initially released an up-tempo number, "Boogie Chillen’", which became Hooker’s first hit single.

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 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 59 - Pine Top’s Boogie Woogie
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Pine Top’s Boogie Woogie
Pine Top received his nickname as a child from his liking for climbing trees. For a time he worked as accompanist for blues singer Ma Rainey
He was recommended by Cow Cow Davenport to J. Mayo Williams at Vocalion Records, and in 1928 he moved, with his wife and young son, to Chicago, Illinois to record.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 58 - Big Boss Man
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Big Boss Man
By the 1950s, Reed had established himself as a popular musician and joined the "Gary Kings" with John Brim, as well as playing on the street with Willie Joe Duncan.
Reed failed to gain a recording contract with Chess Records, but signed with Vee-Jay Records through Brim’s drummer, Albert King. At Vee-Jay, Reed began playing again with Eddie Taylor and soon released "You Don’t Have to Go", his first hit record.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 57 - Terraplane Blues
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Terraplane Blues
"Terraplane Blues" was Johnson’s first single and it became a moderate regional hit, selling 5,000 copies.Johnson used the car model Terraplane as a metaphor for sex.
In the lyrical narrative, the car will not start and Johnson suspects that his girlfriend let another man drive it when he was gone. In describing the various mechanical problems with his Terraplane, Johnson creates a setting of thinly veiled sexual innuendo.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 56 - Maggie Campbell Blues
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Maggie Campbell Blues
Johnson was born near Terry, Mississippi, and moved around 1910 to Crystal Springs where he lived for most of his life.[2] He learned to play the guitar and, by 1914, was supplementing his income by playing at local parties with his brothers Major and LeDell.
he had become an alcoholic and itinerant musician, based in Crystal Springs but traveling widely around the South, sometimes accompanied by Papa Charlie McCoy

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 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 55 - Mr Down Child
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Mr Down Child
Beginning in the 1930s, Sonnyboy Williamson traveled around Mississippi and Arkansas and encountered Big Joe Williams, Elmore James and Robert Lockwood, Jr., also known as Robert Junior Lockwood, who would play guitar on his later Checker Records sides

Williamson’s first recording session took place in 1951 for Lillian McMurry of Jackson, Mississippi’s Trumpet Records, three years after the death of John Lee Williamson, which for the first time allowed some legitimacy to Miller’s carefully worded claim to being "the one and only Sonny Boy Williamson"

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center> » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 54 - Kassie Jones

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Kassie Jones
By 1908, he was playing solo for parties, in taverns, and on the street. He was also invited to play several dates with W. C. Handy’s Orchestra
Furry Lewis tired of the road and took a permanent job in 1922. His position as a street sweeper for the City of Memphis, a job he would hold until his retirement in 1966, allowed him to remain active in the Memphis music scene

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 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 53 - Memory Pain
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Memory Pain
A 1952 automobile accident left Percy Mayfield seriously injured, including a facial disfigurement that limited his performing
. However, that did not stop his prolific songwriting. Mayfield continued to write and record for Specialty until 1954, and then recorded for Chess Records and Imperial Records

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 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 52 - Canned Heat Blues
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Canned Heat Blues
Johnson remained a popular performer in the Jackson area through the 1930s and 1940s, sometimes performing with Ishman Bracey
Tommy Johnson remained a popular performer in the Jackson area through the 1930s and 1940s, sometimes performing with Ishman Bracey

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Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 51 - Juke

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Juke
"Juke" is a harmonica instrumental recorded by then 22-year-old Chicago bluesman Little Walter Jacobs in 1952..
The originally released recording of "Juke" was the first completed take of the first song attempted at the first Little Walter session for Leonard Chess ; the song was released at the end of July on Chess’s subsidiary label Checker Records as Checker single #758.

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 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 50 - Prodigal Son
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Prodigal Son
Wilkins was born in Hernando, Mississippi, 21 miles from Memphis. He worked in Memphis during the 1920s at the same time as Furry Lewis, Memphis Minnie (whom he claimed to have tutored).
His best known songs are "That’s No Way To Get Along" (to which he – an ordained minister since the 1930s – had changed the ’unholy’ words to a biblical theme and since titled it "The Prodigal Son", covered under that title by The Rolling Stones

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 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 49 - Hoodoo Man Blues
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Hoodoo Man Blues
Sonny first recorded for Bluebird Records in 1937 and his first recording, "Good Morning, School Girl", became a standard.
Other well-known recordings of his include "Sugar Mama Blues", "Shake the Boogie", "You Better Cut That Out", "Sloppy Drunk", "Early in the Morning" and "Stop Breaking Down" and "Hoodoo Hoodoo" aka "Hoodoo Man Blues

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 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 47 - Dirty Dozens
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Dirty Dozens
Speckled Red was born Rufus Perryman in Hampton, Georgia. He was an American blues and boogie-woogie piano player and singer
The lyrics were sung rather than spoken, with its elaborate word play and earthy subject matter, "The Dirty Dozens" is considered in some respects an ancestor to rap music

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 » » Histoire de Blues dans 100 chansons Part 46 - Got My Mo-Jo Working
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Got My Mo-Jo Working
Got My Mo-jo Working" is a 1956 song written by Preston Foster and first recorded by Ann Cole & The Suburban, but popularized by Muddy Waters in 1957
Waters’ rendition of the song was featured on the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of 500 Greatest Songs of All Time at #359

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 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 46 - Highway 51
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Highway 51
recorded January 25, 1938 in Chicago, IL ; Curtis Jones, voc, p ; Willie Bee (James), g, Washboard Sam, wb
For the migrant Negro... the long ribbons of the "odd" numbered highways have a magnetic fascination.... He sings of Highway 49.... Often he sings of Highway 61... or of its fellow, Highway 51

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 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 45 - Help Me
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Help Me
Recorded Fevrier 18, 1963, in Chicago, Illinois ; Sonny Boy Williamson 2, vocal/hca ; .Originally issued on Checker 1036 (45 RPM) in 1963
"Help Me" is a blues standard first recorded by Sonny Boy Williamson II in 1963. The song, a mid-tempo twelve-bar blues, is credited to Williamson, Willie Dixon, and Ralph Bass and is based on the 1962 instrumental hit "Green Onions" by Booker T. and the MGs

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 44 - Alabama Bound
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Don’t You Leave Me Here [aka .Alabama Bound]
Recorded c. April 8, 1927, in Chicago, Illinois ; Papa Harvey Hull, vocal ; Long "Cleve" Reed, speech and guitar ; Sunny Wilson, guitar...Originally issued on Black Patti 8002 (78 RPM) in 1927
à voir aussi : http://youtu.be/aPo6_ekG4fg

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 43 - Boogie Chillen
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Boogie Chillen
"Boogie Chillen’" or "Boogie Chillun" is a blues song first recorded by John Lee Hooker in 1948. It is a solo performance featuring Hooker’s vocal, electric guitar, and rhythmic foot stomps. Recorded :United Sound, Detroit, Michigan, 3 November 1948

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 42 - Lets The Good Times Roll
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Let The Good Times Roll
"Let the Good Times Roll" is a jump blues song recorded in 1946 by Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five, on the Decca Label. A mid-tempo twelve-bar blues. The song was written by Sam Theard, a New Orleans-born blues singer and songwriter, and was co-credited to Fleecie Moore, Jordan’s wife.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 41 - Louise Louise Blues
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Louise Louise Blues
rec. November 12, 1936 in Chicago, IL ; Johnnie Temple, voc ; Joshua Altheimer, p ; Johnnie Temple or Charlie McCoy, g. Decca 7244
Temple was born in Canton, Mississippi, United States. Growing up around Jackson, he moved to Chicago in early 1930s, and started playing with Joe McCoy in the clubs.His most popular record, "Louise Louise Blues," on the Decca label, was a hit in 1936.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 40 - Blue Bird Blues
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Blue Bird Blues
rec. May 5, 1937 at Leland Hotel, Aurora, IL ; Sonny Boy Williamson, voc, hca ; Joe Williams, g ; Robert Lee McCoy, g Bluebird 7098
Sonny’s Bluebird Blues covers the recordings Sonny Boy Williamson made for the Bluebird label in 1937-1938. Williamson was one of the first blues harmonica players to make an impact and his rough and ready style became an inspiration to many other players.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 39 - Fever
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Fever
Little Willie John - Fever, rec april 1956 on the label King
One of his biggest hits, "Fever" (1956) (Pop #24), was more famously covered by Peggy Lee in 1958. "Fever" is a song written by Eddie Cooley and Otis Blackwell, who used the pseudonym John Davenport. It was originally recorded by American R&B singer Little Willie John in 1956 and released as a single in April of the same year [source : wikipedia.]

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 38 - Stagolee
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Stack O’Lee Blues
Mississippi John Hurt - Stack O’Lee Blues, rec. December 28, 1928 in New York City

The song was first recorded by Waring’s Pennsylvanians in 1923, and became a hit. Another version was recorded later that year by Frank Westphal & His Regal Novelty Orchestra, and Herb Wiedoeft and his band recorded the song in 1924.[12] Also in 1924, the first version with lyrics was recorded, as "Skeeg-a-Lee Blues", by Lovie Austin. Ma Rainey recorded the song the following year, with Louis Armstrong on cornet, and a notable version was recorded by Frank Hutchison in 1927.

The version by Mississippi John Hurt, recorded in 1928, is regarded as definitive. In his version, as in all such pieces, there are many (sometimes anachronistic) variants on the lyrics. [source Wiki et Wirtz]

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 37 - Midnight Special
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Midnight Special
Leadbelly (Huddie Ledbetter), vocal and guitar. Recorded by John A. and Alan Lomax at the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola, Louisiana, on July 1, 1934.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 36 - Going Down Slow
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Going Down Slow - St. Louis Jimmy
The song is a moderately slow-tempo twelve-bar blues, notated in 4 4 or common time in the key of B. Oden, as St. Louis Jimmy, recorded it in Chicago on November 11, 1941. It was released as a single by Bluebird Records and featured Oden’s vocal with accompaniment by Roosevelt Sykes on piano and Alfred Elkins on "imitation" bass.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 35 - John Henry
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John Henry - Henry Thomas "Ragtime Texas"
recorded June 30, 1927 in Chicago, IL ; Henry Thomas, voc, g, # quills

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 34 - Get Ready to Meet Your Man

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Get Ready To Meet Your Man -James (Beale Street) Clark - Columbia 36948 [78 rpm].
"Look on Yonder Wall", or "Get Ready to Meet Your Man" as it was first named, is a blues song first recorded in 1945 by James "Beale Street" Clark. Clark, also known as "Memphis Jimmy", was a blues pianist from Memphis, Tennessee.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 33 - Early In The Morning

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Sonny Boy Williamson - Early In The Morning
rec. November 11, 1937 at Leland Hotel, Aurora, IL ; Sonny Boy Williamson, voc, hca ; Walter Davis, p ; unknown, g ; 2nd unknown, g

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 32 - The Honeydripper

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“The Honeydripper” - Joe Liggins

1945 was a transitional year in R&B history. Big band records and releases on the major labels still featured prominently on the charts, but independent labels were starting to make inroads. The top selling R&B record of the year was Joe Liggins’ “The Honeydripper” on Leon René’s Exclusive label [recorded mars 26 1945].

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 31 - See That My Grave Kept Clean

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See That My Grave Is Kept Clean
DESCRIPTION : Singer, dying, asks that his grave be kept clean, that his grave be dug with a silver spade, and that he be lowered with a golden chain. AUTHOR : probably Blind Lemon Jefferson EARLIEST DATE : 1928 - Blind Lemon Jefferson - Chicago IL - Rec. : Oct. 1927 or Feb. 1928 - 20374-1 Paramount 12608 - Blind Lemon Jefferson (v,g) - KEYWORDS : death dying funeral nonballad religious floatingverses

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 30 - Mannish Boy

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The original version of "Mannish Boy" was recorded in Chicago on May 24, 1955, under the title "Manish Boy." Accompanying Muddy Waters were Jimmy Rogers on guitar, Junior Wells on harmonica, Fred Below on drums

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 29 - St James Infirmary

Rhythm Willie - Breathtaking Blues -2:34 [rec.Chicago 0ct 10, 1940, label OKEH]
It was on one such song, an instrumental arrangement of "St. James Infirmary" here known as "Breathtakin’ Blues", that Willie demonstrated his facility at playing’ fifth position’ harmonica, a difficult and unique sounding method of playing a minor-key melody on a harmonica tuned to a major key—a method that was, and still is, very rarely utilized by harmonica players in any type of music, but one which Willie practiced here with unfaltering mastery and to great effect.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 28 - It aint nobody’s Business
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’Taint Nobody’s Biz-Ness If I Do
Bessie Smith (April 26, 1923, Columbia 3898. In Smith’s version, the lyrics also deal with an abusive partner : At the piano mr. Clarence Williams

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 27 - Catfish Blues
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Catfish Blues (059476-1)
rec. March 28, 1941 in Chicago, Ill. ; Robert Petway, voc, g ; prob. Alfred Elkins, imb
Bluebird Records B8838

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 26 - Walking Blues
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- Walkin’ Blues - rec. May 28, 1930 in Grafton, WI ; Son House, voc, g ; Willie Brown, g test pressing found in 1985, now in the possession of Richard Nevins @ Yazoo Recs - Paramount unissued ? - Document DLP 532 (1988)

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 25 - Crawling King Snake
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Joe Williams - Crawlin’ King Snake (Bluebird B8738) rec. Chicago, March 27, 1941 ; Joe Williams, voc, g ; William Mitchell, imb Bluebird B8738
As "Crawling King Snake", it was first recorded by Big Joe Williams on March 27, 1941. The song is a country-style blues, with Williams on vocal and nine-string guitar and William Mitchell providing imitation bass accompaniment.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 24 - Why Don’t You Do Right
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The Harlem Hamfats - Weed Smoker’s Dream Rec : 2 Oct 1936 Chicago
"Why Don’t You Do Right ?" first appeared in 1936 as "The Weed Smoker’s Dream," written and composed by McCoy and recorded by his band, the Harlem Hamfats. source :http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Why_Don%27t_You_Do_Right%3F

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 23 - Shake Em On Down
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Bukka White - Shake ‘Em On Down (C-1997-1) - 1937 rec. September 2, 1937 in Chicago, IL ; Bukka White, voc, g ; unknown, g
"Shake ’Em On Down" is usually credited to Booker Washington "Bukka" White - a cousin of BB King’s. He’s done a few versions of this song including Sept/2/1937 in Chicago, issued on Vocalion 03711, and on his redicovery album recorded by John Fahey and Ed Denson, 1963 in Memphis, Tennessee.

 » » Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 22 - Sitting On Top Of The World
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MISSISSIPPI SHEIKS - Sitting On Top Of The World (403805-A or -B) rec. February 17, 1930 in Shreveport, LA ; Walter Vinson, voc, g ; Lonnie Chatman, vn ; # Bo Chatman, 2nd g OKeh 8784 [= Vocalion 03188]

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansonsPart 21 - Corinna Blues
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Corinna Blues April19ter>26 - Chicago IL - 2544-1-2 Paramount 12367 - Blind Lemon Jefferson (v,g)

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 20 - Mama Talk To Your Daughter
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J.B. LENORE
- Mamma Talk To Your Daughter (P53214-2)
- Man Watch Your Woman (P53215) rec. October 6, 1954 in Chicago, IL ; J.B. Lenoir, voc, g ; Lorenzo Smith, ts ; Joe Montgomery, p ; Al Galvin, dr

J. B. Lenoir doing his biggest hit, "Mama Talk To Your Daughter" backed by "Man Watch Your Woman," release on Parrot Records in 1954and reaching Number 11 on the Billboard R&B charts

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 19 - How Long, How Long Blues
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Leroy Carr (vocal and piano) and Scrapper Blackwell (guitar) recorded the song in Indianapolis, Indiana on June 19, 1928 for Vocalion Records,(cat. no. 1191).

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 18 - Dark Road
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FLOYD JONES- Dark Road (U1006) Chess 1498
rec. December 29, 1951 in Chicago, IL ; Floyd Jones, voc, g ; Little Walter, hca ; Jimmy Rogers, g ; poss. Willie Coven, dr. [ref .Wirz]

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 17 - Five Long Years
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Juillet/1952 - EDDIE BOYD Sings and Plays - Five Long Years (50-181) rec. May 30 or June 19, 1952 in Chicago, IL ; Eddie Boyd, voc, p ; Ernest Cotton, ts [added June 19, 1952] ; L.C. McKinley, g ; Alfred Elkins, b ; Percy Walker, dr

ref. Wirz

,

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 16 - Tin Pan Alley
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CURTIS JONES- Tin Pan Alley (C-3956-1)

rec. August 18, 1941 in Chicago, IL ; Curtis Jones, voc, p ; Ransom Knowling, sb - OKeh 06494

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 15 - Highway 49
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Bluebird 9025 - Joe Williams - Highway 49 (070485-1) rec. Chicago, December 12, 1941 ; Joe Williams, voc, g ; Sonnyboy Williamson, hca ; Alfred Elkins, bass cano
ref.wirz

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 14 - Mama Don’t Allow....
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VOCALION-1434 - COW COW DAVENPORT - MAMA DON’T ALLOW NO EASY RIDERS HERE - C3695 - (Chicago) 6/22/1929

.

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 13 - Rollin and Tumblin
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HAMBONE WILLIE NEWBERN
- Nobody Knows (What The Good Deacon Does) (402296-B) # - Roll And Tumble Blues (402306-B)* * rec. March 14, 1929 in Atlanta, GA ; Hambone Willie Newbern, voc, g

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 12 - Kokomo Blues
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Old Original Kokomo Blues (C-9429-B) rec. September 10, 1934 in Chicago, Ill. ; Kokomo Arnold, voc, g

Born as James Arnold in Lovejoy’s Station, Georgia, he got his nickname in 1934 after releasing "Old Original Kokomo Blues" for the Decca label ; it was a cover of the Scrapper Blackwell blues song about the city of Kokomo, Indiana

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 11 - Key To The Highway
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1940 - Jazz Gillum - May 9, 1940 - Chicago IL - 044972-1 Bluebird 8529 - 78 rpm
Jazz Gillum (v,h), Big Bill Broonzy (g), prob. Alfred Erkins or Al Collins (imb)

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 10 - Dust My Broom
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I Believe I’ll Make A Change - Leroy Carr (pno,vcl) Scrapper Blackwell (gtr) Vocalion 2820 - 16.08.1934 - 78 rpm

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 9 - Sweet Little Angel
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02753 TAMPA RED BLACK ANGEL BLUES CP1045=1 - (Chicago) 3/23/1934
In 1934, Tampa Red recorded "Black Angel Blues" (Vocalion 2753). The song was performed at a slower tempo and featured prominent slide-guitar lines by Tampa Red.

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 8 - Tim Moore’s Farm
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1948 Lightnin’ Hopkins Tim Moore’s Farm / You Don’t Know Goldstar 640

Short name Gold Star Records
Current Address : Houston, TX, United States 157
Founded by Bill Quinn

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 7 - The Red Rooster
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The Red Rooster (10938) # Recorded. June 1961 in Chicago, IL ; Howlin’ Wolf, voc, # g ; Johnny Jones, p ; Hubert Sumlin, g ; unknown, el-b ; Willie Dixon, b ; Sam Lay, dr

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 6 - Bottle Up and Go
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Bluebird 7012 SONNY BOY WILLIAMSON GOT BOTTLE UP & GONE - (CHICAGO) 5/5/37

In 1937, John Lee "Sonny Boy" Williamson recorded the song as "Got the Bottle Up and Go" (or "Got Bottle Up & Gone") (Bluebird 7012). It was performed as an early Chicago blues with Williamson on vocal and harmonica accompanied by Big Joe Williams and Robert Lee McCoy (later known as Robert Nighthawk) on guitars. These early versions of "Bottle Up and Go" include the refrain "High-powered mama, daddy’s (or papa’s) got your water on".

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 5 - Crosscut Saw
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Stax 201 - Crosscut Saw* / Down Don’t Bother Me - 1966 *also recorded in 1964 by The Binghampton Blues Boys on XL 901.

Albert King [gtr and vcl] with producer-drummer Al Jackson, Jr., guitarist Steve Cropper, keyboards ace Booker T. Jones, and bass player Donald "Duck"Dunn-aka Booker T. and the MG’s

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 4 - Rock Me Baby
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Big Bill Broonzy (g, vo), Memphis Slim (p), Ransom Knowling (sb). Chicago, December 17, 1940.

OKEH 6116 A Big Bill Broonzy Rockin’ Chair Blues 1941
OKEH 6116 B Big Bill Broonzy Gettin’ Older Every Day 1941

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 3 - Smokestack Lightning
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"Mr. Freddie" Spruell
- Tom Cat Blues (20727-2) @ youtube
- Low-Down Mississippi Bottom Man (20728-1) @ youtube
rec. c.July 1928 in Chicago ; Freddie Spruell, voc, g
[ref .www.wirz.de/music/spruell.htm, this site is sponsored by us]

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 2 - Highway 61
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Recordings by ’Roosevelt Sykes’
Highway 61 Blues - CHAMPION (by Gennett and Decca) - 16586 - 1932-09-22 ; matrix : G18802 ; 3 min
Highway 61 Blues - CHAMPION (by Gennett and Decca) - 50012 - 1932-09-22 ; matrix : G18802 ; xref : CH16586 ; 3 min

Histoire de Blues dans 62 chansons Part 1 - Baby Please Don’t Go
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Joe Williams

- Break ’Em On Down (070487-1)
- Please Don’t Go (070484-1)

rec. Chicago, December 12, 1941 ; Joe Williams, voc, g ; Sonnyboy Williamson, hca ; Alfred Elkins, bass cano